Time for a Top 10

As we’re now 100 posts in to this little odyssey around the age of adventure, I thought I’d do a little stock take to see which subjects have been the most popular. After all it’s a fairly broad church here at the S&G, so one never really knows if it’s going in the right direction for people to enjoy.

Gratifyingly, all the subjects seem to be at about the same level of interest in terms of the number of people reading them – and that number’s going up all the time, so thank you! And if you’re interested then here’s the pick of the pops in your top 10 most popular posts so far – cue the music…

In at 10 it’s The Racing Driver’s Bride and the story of the beautiful Hollywood actress who married Ferrari’s 1950s ace Peter Collins.

At 9 it’s some classic pin-up action from Elvgren’s Skirt & Giggles.

In at number 8 it’s Airfix and its all-new Lancaster kit.

At 7 it’s time to hit the bar with Mike and the Members.

And at 6 we have the story of Tazio Nuvolari’s TT-winning Alfa.

In at number 5 it’s the bitter-sweet story of aviation heroine Jean Batten.

At four we’ve got Sir Stirling Moss falling foul of political correctness, and now it’s time to see where your mouse has been leading you most often here at the S&G

At number 3 it’s a mystery and a whodunit – and still we don’t know who tends Dick Seaman’s grave.

The runner-up spot is currently held by the Dornier Do17 that lay on the Goodwin Sands for more than 70 years before the RAF Museum pulled it up from beneath the English Channel. They got the whole thing up – not ‘arf!

Yet for all the many stories about cars and planes, it’s one of the few so far about boats which is holding sway. Yes, you style-conscious lot, you’ve put Brigitte Bardot at the top of the pile with the story of her love affair with Riva powerboats. So here’s a little something to keep you happy this summer, with BB on the quayside…

BB offers a little thank you to all the S&G's visitors - we hope to see you soon!

BB offers a little thank you to all the S&G’s visitors – we hope to see you soon!

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Gladiator Survivors #2 – The Shuttleworth Collection

It’s rather a startling thought that one particular aircraft has been entertaining the nation for more than half a century as a relic of the last peacetime days of the 1930s. And yet there she is, the Shuttleworth Collection’s celebrated Gloster Gladiator, L8032, describing graceful arcs and sweeping climbs above Old Warden just as she has since 1960…

L8032 on a trip to Duxford's Flying Legends air display

L8032 basks in the sun on a trip to Duxford’s Flying Legends air display

L8032 was the last Gladiator I airframe built from the initial order made in 1935. All the components were built in 1937 but not actually assembled until 1938. Like her sister aircraft from this final batch, now on display at the RAF Museum, the completed L8032 immediately went into storage as the more modern Hawker Hurricane monoplane and soon-to-arrive Supermarine Spitfire took precedence in Fighter Command’s attention.

In the autumn of 1943 L8032 was brought out of storage and sent to 61 Operational Training Unit in readiness for a new job with a film unit called Independent Producers, which was to use the aircraft to shoot scenes for a film of the book Signed With Their Honour. This was to be a ‘factional’ retelling of the story of 80 Squadron and its Gladiators which fought to the last man and the last aircraft in the retreat from Greece and Crete in 1941.

At home at the Shuttleworth Collection’s airfield, Old Warden

Remarkably, all three complete surviving Gladiators – including The Fighter Collection’s N5903 – had an active role to play in the movie and were assigned to 61 OTU while the film was made. Two Gladiators were lost in a mid-air collision during filming but the survivors completed their tour of duty as stars of the silver screen before being mothballed once again.

L8032 would emerge once more in 1946 when she was put on display in Hyde Park. On 16 March 1948, L8032 was struck off the RAF’s charge list and bought back by the Gloster aircraft company along with N5903. Clearly the ailing Gloster company had no real idea what to do with these old machines and in 1950 both the Gladiators were delivered to Air Service Training for use as instructional airframes at Hamble and Ansty.

You can get up close at any time when the Shuttleworth Collection opens to the public

When RAF Ansty closed the two old aircraft were bought by Viv Bellamy for a nominal sum and L8032 was restored to flying condition using the engine from N5903 and the civilian registration G-AMRK. In 1956, Gloster decided that it wanted its aircraft back again and bought them from Bellamy, refitting L8032 was in full military specification and painting her in 72 Squadron markings, albeit with the fictitious serial K8032.

When Gloster Aircraft finally closed for business at the end of 1960,  L8032 was presented to the Shuttleworth Collection for safe keeping – and has remained there ever since. After many years of service she was completely overhauled in 1990 and repainted in a camouflage scheme of 247 Squadron, the only Gladiator unit to take part in the Battle of Britain. She wore these colours until 1996, when another new skin saw her returned to pre-war silver in hue – albeit in Norwegian markings for another film appearance.

Ready for another season in 2013: one of the longest-serving display aircraft in the UK

Finally in 2007 L8032 re-appeared in the colourful blue and yellow flashes of K7985, a 73 Squadron Gladiator that was flown with memorable vigour by the future WW2 ace ‘Cobber’ Kain at the 1937 Hendon Air Pageant. It is these colours which she carries to this day, and which are about to be replicated by a new model kit by Airfix.

The Scarf & Goggles proudly salutes this fine old girl and all who care for her. Here’s to another 50 years in the air over Bedfordshire…

 

Airfix encouraging kids to build Spitfires

Not content with extending its range of ever-better kits with the new Lancaster, Airfix has now created a project to give schools and youth groups a chance to build its recent and highly acclaimed Spitfire Mk.I

Home-made hangars and airfield accessories complete this group

Home-made hangars and airfield accessories complete this group

Project Airfix allows schools and recognised youth groups and organisations to buy 15 kits, 18 pots of paint, 23 brushes and 15 tubes of glue for just £39.99 inc. UK postage. Not only that, but for as long as stocks last there will be 15 Messerschmitt Bf109E kits thrown in for good measure – so that’s 30 kits with paint and glue for less than £40.

The 'new tool' Spitfire kit is one of Airfix's latest acclaimed releases

The ‘new tool’ Spitfire kit is one of Airfix’s latest acclaimed releases

Sounds like an entirely brilliant scheme to us… so if you have a school or youth group in need of some constructive entertainment, point them in this direction: Project Airfix

project_airfix_logo

Airfix delights little boys of all ages

It’s not every day that Airfix releases an all-new Avro Lancaster. In fact it’s about once every 20 years on average. To mark the 70th anniversary of Operation CHASTISE and the ingenious ‘bouncing bomb’ created by Barnes Wallis that was delivered by the brave young men led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, an all-new model kit in 1/72 scale has been produced and it goes on sale this weekend:

New box, new model... a happy day for big kids

New box, new model… a happy day for big kids

Today model kits, like Scalextric cars and pretty well everything else these days, are made using 3D CAD design, making for the most crisp, detailed and accurate miniatures around. Well, they do if they’re done properly. The proof of the pudding is in the eating, so here’s one that has been done in advance of the model’s launch:

Pre-production model put together by one of the members at Britmodeller.com

Pre-production model put together by one of the members at Britmodeller.com

It looks like the only way you’ll get a better Dam-Buster Lanc is to be Peter Jackson!Curiously neither of the versions included in the decal set is the celebrated AJ-G flown by Gibson himself. Presumably they think that enough people will have those decals left over from older kits. Instead you get AJ-T, a reserve aircraft flown by Ft Lt Joseph Charles McCarthy DFC RCAF, and AJ-E flown by Flight Lieutenant Robert Norman George Barlow DFC RAAF.

And if the kit isn’t enough to satisfy your commemorative urges then there’s a new print available by the same chap who did the box art. Yes, the ‘painting’ is also done on computers these days…

New Dam-Buster print by Finest Hour designer, Adam Tooby

New Dam-Buster print by Finest Hour designer, Adam Tooby

The kit carries a retail price of £29.99 but discounts are often available from specialist retailers. The print is available from Finest Hour Art (click to visit) at £24.99 for A3 and £29.99 for A2.

A perfect way to unwind…

A good weekend’s work: 1950s model kits reissued by Airfix

In the 1950s, Airfix released its first 1/72 scale model aircraft kits. The Spitfire was first of course, but among the aviation icons that followed soon after was the pre-war de Havilland Comet racer, hero of the 1934 MacRobertson Air Race and several other record-breaking flights through the late 1930s.

It was astonishingly basic, with just 24 pieces to glue together and a single colour to paint.

Recently, Airfix has reissued the kit for the umpteenth time but, this time, there’s a twist: rather than the winning aircraft from the 1934 race, ‘Grosvenor House’, it has released its two stablemates: ‘Black Magic’ and the unnamed aircraft known to all as ‘The Green’Un’.

The passage of 60 years and many, many hundreds of thousands of kits stamped out from the original moulds makes the kit quite hard work at times… sandpaper, plastic filler and a decent stock of swear words are required. But the results – even for a rank amateur such as myself – are well worth the investment in my view.

I hope you agree…